Understanding Humidity and Dew Point

Dew Point Meter

As with so many of the posts here at The Weekly Pellet, I like to try and demystify things. One topic that seems to cause a lot of confusion, unless you are a meteorologist, is humidity and relative humidity and dew points.

Let’s spend a little time talking about these terms.

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News Digest 7/31/2017

The Front Page 2

Teknor Apex introduces new line of medical grade TPVs

Mitsui increasing polypropylene capacity

Weekly Resin Report: Copolymer PP resin supply tightening

Formosa declares “force majeure” on some PVC resins

First half of 2017 sees volatile PP market

Commodity resin sales growth not that strong this year

Clariant part of EU investigation into ethylene purchasing

LyondellBasell to supply technology to Chinese petrochemical company

BASF reports 12% sales growth in Q2 2017

 

News Digest 7/24/2017

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Toray introduces two new high barrier PET films

Scientists make polycarbonate from chemical extracted from lemons and carbon dioxide

Global Plastics Summit returns to Chicago in October

Weekly Resin Report: Producers nominate $0.03-0.05/lb increase for polypropylene in August

A. Schulman lowers financial outlook for 2017

AkzoNobel CEO steps down citing health reasons

Why do we Call it Nylon Anyway?

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Originally published March 2, 2016

Did you know that Parmesan cheese is trademarked and refers only to cheese produced in a specific region of Italy? It is illegal in Europe to call cheese produced outside 5 specific Italian provinces Parmesan. There has never been any Kobe beef sold in the United States. Kobe is a Japanese trademark and refers to beef specifically from Japan’s Hyogo Prefecture, even though every restaurant in Las Vegas serves it. How about Balsamic Vinegar? Oh, you get the idea.

We have a bad habit of ignoring these food trademarks in the United States although in recent years, the Champagne trademark seems to be respected a bit with all of the products not from Champagne France being called sparkling wine instead.

How about Nylon? A number of chemical companies all around the world call their product Nylon but what is Nylon? Is it a chemical name? No, the chemical name is polyamide. Why is all polyamide referred to as Nylon? Is this another violation of someone’s valuable trademark?

Actually the term nylon is not trademarked even though DuPont did coin the term. It’s an interesting story.

Continue reading “Why do we Call it Nylon Anyway?”