Condensation and Polypropylene

IMG_0901

A common and frustrating problem with polypropylene materials and especially filled polypropylene materials is surface moisture on the pellets. Polypropylene is not hygroscopic so it does not absorb moisture out of the atmosphere but if the pellets have moisture on the surface, it will cause the same problems as you would experience running wet hygroscopic material like nylon. You will experience splay and loss of physical properties.

Continue reading “Condensation and Polypropylene”

News Digest 7/16/2018

KRLD News Room

Weekly Resin Report: No fireworks in spot resin trading during fourth of July week

The Plastics Exchange market update 7/6/2018

Prices flat for PE, PS, PVC; up for PP & PET

Ascend declares force majeure on nylon 66

Kraiburg introduces new TPEs aimed at automotive interior parts

Carolina Color acquires Chroma Corp

BASF introduces new hydrolysis resistant polyesters

Evonik starts process to carve out PMMA and MMA business

BASF considering building chemicals complex in China (behind paywall)

US polypropylene imports slip in May

 

 

 

Nylon 66 Supplies Are Tight And Expected To Remain So

49750_107420275

If you have not already seen price increases on nylon 66, you will soon. Nylon 66 is in tight supply and prices are increasing anywhere from $.10-$.50/lb depending on the grade.

There have been seven force-majeures declared on nylon 66 in 2018. The shortage is being caused by a shortage of adiponitrile (ADN) which is an ingredient used to make nylon 66.

Believe it or not, some of the reason for the shortage stems from Hurricane Harvey which hit the Texas gulf coast in August of last year. There are only 4 plants in the world that make ADN. Two of the plants are on the Texas gulf coast and they both went down before the hurricane hit. These plants don’t just turn back on with a switch, it takes a lot of time to get them started back up and up to full production.

The other factor is increasing demand for nylon 66. This is partly because of the improved US economy and partly because of light-weighting efforts being carried out by the auto industry which is causing a lot of parts that were previously make of metal to be switched to lighter engineering thermoplastics like nylon.

At some point, reduced supply and increased demand clash and unfortunately, we have passed that point.

It will likely take several years for more supply to come on line, in the meantime expect higher prices and longer lead times.

One option that some processors might explore is switching to nylon 6. Nylon 6 has reduced heat resistance but has higher impact and better surface appearance. Nylon 6 supplies are not great either but it is not as tight as 66. I have not seen any nylon 6 price increases this year as of yet. If a lot of people switch their nylon 66 applications to 6, we could see supply become very tight on 6 as well.

News Digest 5/29/2018

Long Row of Typewriters

Weekly Resin Report: Transactions rebound as industry returns from NPE2018

The Plastics Exchange market update 5/18/2018

Kraiburg introduces new line of TPE’s for outdoor industrial applications

Studies question the efficacy of biodegradable plastics

SABIC debuts new soft touch polypropylene grades aimed at automotive interiors

Lyondellbasell rumored to be mulling offer for controlling stake in Braskem

April was a calm month for resin pricing

M. Holland to distribute 3-D printing filament for Owens Corning

Total, Borealis and Nova Chemicals finalize major US joint venture

 

The Santoprene Durometer Mystery

santoprene-bag.jpg

I have always known that the two-digit numbers in the Santoprene grades referred to the durometer hardness of the grades. For instance,  Santoprene 101-55 is a 55 Shore A, 101-73 is a 73 Shore A, 101-87 is an 87 Shore A etc. Sometimes its good to verify the things that you know to be true.

Continue reading “The Santoprene Durometer Mystery”

Glass Transition Temperature and You

www.harrogateironing.co_.uk-Extreme-ironing-underwater-with-Shark

Glass transition temperature is an often discussed but poorly understood property of plastic materials. I want to clear up some of the mystery of glass transition temperature and help you understand how it can be used in picking the right material for an application.

I know what you’re thinking. What does ironing have to do with glass transition temperature? Read on and find out.

Continue reading “Glass Transition Temperature and You”